Faded Water Stenciling

I received my email newsletter from Splitcoaststampers today, and just had to try out the new tutorial! If you’re not familiar with Splitcoaststampers, you really should check them out. It’s a website with literally thousands (if not hundreds of thousands) of crafters who contribute pictures & ideas. The wonderful folk who run and moderate it are awesome, too; you’re probably very familiar with Lydia Fiedler, who is the community manager and amazing artist. The tutorial link included in today’s newsletter is for Faded Water Stenciling, presented by Dina Kowal. Dina is the Splitcoaststampers Tutorial Coordinator, and Artist in Residence. For amazing artwork and stamping projects, be sure to check out her website, HERE.

FADED WATER STENCILING

This technique is very easy to do! Which makes it more appealing, especially if you’re like me, and running behind on projects, housework, and seemingly life in general. All you need is watercolour paper, a stencil, water reactive ink (like Distress Inks), a water mister and paper towel.

Faded Water Stenciling

Choose whatever colours you want for your project! This technique creates a beautiful background for you to use, on any project.

DETAILS

Basically, start with a piece of watercolour paper. Blend the first colour of Distress Ink on the top third, and then blend in the 2nd colour underneath. Next, layer your stencil over top of the paper. Blend the 2nd colour of ink over the stencil, on the bottom third of the paper. The colours I chose are Abandoned Coral and Spiced Marmalade.  I used the Pods stencil from Lavinia Stamps.

Now comes the magic! With the stencil still over the paper, mist water on the top two thirds – the ink blended portions. Don’t be too heavy with the water – it shouldn’t bleed underneath the stencil. Now take your paper towel, and press down over the stencil, picking up the water from the paper. The water activates the ink, and lightens it where you pick it up!  Have a closer look, in the photo below.

Faded Water Stenciling

It’s a subtle look, but very effective!

CREATE YOUR CARD

I decided to use my Fade Water Stencil as a background for a card. I stamp the Picket Fence Studios A Paper Hug stamp in Nocturne ink onto Vellum. Next, cover the stamping with clear embossing powder, and set with a heat tool. Die cut the sentiment, and attach it with small dots of liquid glue, to the stenciled background.

Choose coordinating cardstock to layer for your card, and then add a few embellishments. I found sequins in the Picket Fence Studios Candy Corn Shot sequin mix to use.

Faded Water Stenciling

TRY THE FADED WATER STENCILING TUTORIAL!

HERE is the link to Dina’s tutorial, at Splitcoaststampers.  For supplies I chose, links are below. Have fun!

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Written by 

I've always liked to create things, but I'm not a great artist, or sculptor, or any type of 'traditional' artist - but I love to create! I love the satisfaction of a completed project. Whether a card, painting or other project - as long as it can create a smile, evoke a feeling, or some type of reaction in the recipient. I hope you will enjoy sharing my creations, and occasional ramblings; I'd enjoy having you create with me! :)

6 thoughts on “Faded Water Stenciling

    1. Thanks, Jackie! I hope you give it a try, and share. With different styles of stencils you’d get different looks, I’m sure.

    2. ILovely card Deborah. I like the stencil you used and colours. I haven’t seen this technique before, so appreciate the details.

      1. Thanks, Penny! Yes, I love the inspiration from the Splitcoaststamper newsletters 🙂 Always something new to try!

    1. So glad that you like this technique & card, Buffy! I found that really small stencil openings didn’t allow for enough colour lift – have fun playing!

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